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GoToMeeting Five: A List of Canadian Startups Innovating Right Now

 

 

The GoToMeeting Five profiles five of the hottest and most promising tech startups across Canada each month. The list is curated by Techvibes editorial staff and reflects who’s making waves in our nation’s tech ecosystem right now.

Communicate better. Build trust. Get more done. GoToMeeting is the extremely simple, extraordinarily powerful web conferencing service from Citrix. It integrates HD video conferencing, screen sharing and audio conferencing, creating a natural face-to-face collaboration environment on your Mac, PC, iPad, iPhone or Android device. And you can hold unlimited meetings for one low flat fee. GoToMeeting will change the way you work—and perhaps a whole lot more.

Want to be a part of the next GoToMeeting Five? This list isn’t something you can apply for—but make a splash and you’re certain to get on our radar. Check out the third edition of the GoToMeeting Five after the jump.

 

DreamQii, Toronto

DreamQii, a robotics company based out of the DMZ at Ryerson University, recently led the highest grossing Canadian campaign in Indiegogo’s history, raising over $2.5 million to support the production of PlexiDrone.

The small, portable and sophisticated drone can be easily operated by a smartphone or tablet, enabling users to take breathtaking aerial photographs and videos. Started by a Ryerson aerospace engineering grad, DreamQii has grown to ten full-time staff and is planning on manufacturing PlexiDrone in Ontario.

 

Granify, Edmonton

Granify is a leading automatic e-commerce revenue optimization platform. Granify has developed technology that automatically converts more online shoppers by predicting, in real time, which shoppers aren’t going to purchase and providing contextual stimuli to help overcome objections.

The former Extreme Startups company announced earlier today that they just secured a $9 million Series A investment from Peter Thiel’s Valar Ventures.

 

MagniWare, Toronto

MagniWare aims to change the way we think about accurately tracking wearables. They’ve developed an adhesive technology and implemented it into a patch, thinner than an iPhone 6 that can be easily stuck onto the skin, anywhere on the body, and reused.

To maintain the adhesive property, users can just wash the patch with soap and water. Describing it as a “second skin,” They plan to launch their product this fall.

 

Mnubo, Montreal

Mnubo is an Internet of Things data analytics company. Mnubo announced earlier this month that it has raised a $6 million round of financing led by White Star Capital and including McRock Capital. Funds will be used to accelerate its IoT data science development and expand the commercialization of its SmartObjects analytics service.

Last year mnubo was named one of PwC’s 10 Up-and-Coming Canadian Tech Companies and one of Deloitte’s 15 Companies To Watch in Canada.

 

Videostream, Kitchener

Founded by McMaster valedictorian Matt Gardner, Videostream has garnered more than 1.3 million users since launching 18 months ago. Videostream is ingeniously simple, and entirely practical.

The service allows users to wirelessly stream all manner of video files from a computer to a smart TV, and eliminates many of the compatibility and quality issues that plague the state-of-the-art televisions. Prior to Videostream, most smart TVs would only accommodate roughly 20 per cent of video file types.

Gardner’s startup company, Videostream, has garnered more than 180,000 users since officially launching 14 weeks ago. The team is now living in a clean, five-bedroom home that doubles as the nerve centre for their burgeoning operation. These days, the living room is strictly reserved for business.

“For a while it’s all Ramen instant noodles and very little sleep, and things can be pretty stressful. But then you reach a point where everything starts happening in a hurry and it’s an exciting feeling,” said Gardner, who will graduate from McMaster on June 11 and serve as one of two valedictorians for the Faculty of Engineering. “I already have a full-time career waiting for me after graduation.”

Videostream is ingeniously simple, and entirely practical. The service allows users to wirelessly stream all manner of video files from a computer to a smart TV, and eliminates many of the compatibility and quality issues that plague the state-of-the-art televisions. Prior to Videostream, most smart TVs would only accommodate roughly 20 per cent of video file types, explained Gardner.

Gardner’s startup company, Videostream, has garnered more than 180,000 users since officially launching 14 weeks ago. The team is now living in a clean, five-bedroom home that doubles as the nerve centre for their burgeoning operation. These days, the living room is strictly reserved for business.

“For a while it’s all Ramen instant noodles and very little sleep, and things can be pretty stressful. But then you reach a point where everything starts happening in a hurry and it’s an exciting feeling,” said Gardner, who will graduate from McMaster on June 11 and serve as one of two valedictorians for the Faculty of Engineering. “I already have a full-time career waiting for me after graduation.”

Videostream is ingeniously simple, and entirely practical. The service allows users to wirelessly stream all manner of video files from a computer to a smart TV, and eliminates many of the compatibility and quality issues that plague the state-of-the-art televisions. Prior to Videostream, most smart TVs would only accommodate roughly 20 per cent of video file types, explained Gardner.

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